E-ISSN 2602-3164
ejmi. 2019; 3(4): 327-332 | DOI: 10.14744/ejmi.2019.19323

Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Microbiology, Antibiotic Resistance, Changing Trends, and Clinical Implications from the 10-Year Experience of a Single Center

Sebnem Calik1, Alpay Ari1, Zeki Tuncel Tekgul2, Huseyin Ozkarakas2, Neslihan Genc3, Hazal Ezgi Ciftci2, Selma Tosun1, Reyhan Yis4
1Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, University of Health Sciences Izmir Bozyaka Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, University of Health Sciences Izmir Bozyaka Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey, 3Department of Healthcare Services, University of Health Sciences Izmir Bozyaka Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey, 4Department of Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology, University of Health Sciences Izmir Bozyaka Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey

Objectives: This study aimed to determine how ventilator - associated pneumonia (VAP) frequency, and antibiotic susceptibilities are affected by the changes in the intensive care unit (ICU) conditions in adult patients. Methods: In this retrospective study, 457 VAP patients diagnosed in the ICUs of a training hospital between 2008 and 2017 were analyzed. Alterations in VAP rates during this period were evaluated. Results: Our results indicated that the improvement of physical conditions, and VAP prevention measures yielded a remarkable decline in the rates of VAP. VAP rates (cases per 1000 ventilator-days) decreased significantly between before 2013 and 2013-2017 periods (from 16.1 to 7.1; p<0.0000001). A total of 504 VAP episodes developed and 569 microorganisms were identified. The most frequent microorganisms were Acinetobacter baumanii (33.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (31.6%), Klebsiella pneumonia (12%). The resistances against sulbactam-ampicillin, imipenem, and meropenem were increased significantly after 2013. (p=0.002, p<0.001, p=0.001; respectively.) There was a noteworthy surge in resistances against colistin (p=0.010) in Gram - negative bacteria and teicoplanin in Gram - positive bacteria (p=0.044). Conclusion: The study shows that the rates of VAP can be decreased with collaboration with other disciplines, adherence to preventative measures and continue education of healthcare workers. Keywords: Antibiotic resistance, etiology, rate, ventilator - associated pneumonia


Cite This Article

Calik S, Ari A, Tekgul Z, Ozkarakas H, Genc N, Ciftci H, Tosun S, Yis R. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Microbiology, Antibiotic Resistance, Changing Trends, and Clinical Implications from the 10-Year Experience of a Single Center. ejmi. 2019; 3(4): 327-332

Corresponding Author: Calik S.

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